U Roast 2

Your Home Coffee Roasting Guide – Because You Should Enjoy the Full Flavour of Freshly Roasted Coffee

H


Handpicking
Coffee cherries do not ripen at the same time – a tree branch can simultaneously bear blossoms, green fruit, and ripe cherries – quality coffees must be picked by hand over three to four visits per tree each year. A good picker can pick about 200 pounds of coffee cherries in one day, equal to about 50 pounds of green coffee beans.

Most dry-processed coffee is picked carelessly, which compromises the flavor with unwanted green or overripe fruit. Processed with care, however, dry-processed coffees can be as good as washed coffees, if not better owing to their complexity and fruit-toned sweetness.

Hard Bean
Coffee grown at the relatively high altitudes of 4,000 to 4,500 feet. Coffee grown above 4,500 feet is referred to as strictly hard bean. The higher the altitude, the slower the beans mature, making them harder and denser than other beans and more desirable.

Harvesting
The Coffea plant blossoms continuously, and will often simultaneously bear green fruits, fully ripe red cherries and overripe ones. Handpicking is thus preferred, if it is conducted with care to avoid contaminating a harvest with either green or overripe beans. This labour-intensive harvesting method also keeps the green fruit on the tree for the next round of harvesting, leading to less waste, although overripe fruit inevitably falls to the ground. A quicker, but less accurate harvesting method is stripping.

HB (Hard Bean)
Coffee grown at the relatively high altitudes of 4,000 to 4,500 feet. Coffee grown above 4,500 feet is referred to as strictly hard bean. The higher the altitude, the slower the beans mature, making them harder and denser than other beans and more desirable.

Heavy
The result of a high level of fine bean particles and insoluble proteins suspended in the coffee beverage.

Heavy roast
Coffee beans roasted to a very dark brown, with a shiny surface; equivalent to Italian Roast.

Hemileia vastatrix
See leaf rust

Home roasting
Although relatively uncommon today, until the late 1800’s people roasted their coffee at home, typically using popcorn poppers and stove-top frying pans.

Back to  Coffee Index

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: